The Bigger Picture – No DAM is an Island

Before they had dictionaries, John Donne wrote:

No Man is an Island
No man is an Iland, intire of itselfe; every man
is a peece of the Continent, a part of the maine;
if a Clod bee washed away by the Sea, Europe
is the lesse, as well as if a Promontorie were, as
well as if a Manor of thy friends or of thine
owne were; any mans death diminishes me,
because I am involved in Mankinde;
And therefore never send to know for whom
the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.

MEDITATION XVII: Devotions upon Emergent Occasions

The same is true for your DAM. It doesn’t just need the use and involvement of teams of users to influence its ongoing development, regular attention from a Librarian and a developer, and a manager to oversee it all. To realize its full potential, it needs to connect: connect to other systems, to have it’s role in a true workflow, to automate billing and tagging tasks, to be part of the PIM (Product Information Management) system.  On this topic are two recent articles, one from cmswire, and the other, from Widen.

Graphics are always great, as a picture is worth a thousand words.

How DAM and PIM Streamline E-commerce by Nate Holmes speaks to how a proper DAM takes its place among the PIM, ERP, and end-site usage systems in a large organization, say one that has a websie full of products for sale. t discusses a case study with Harman, Inc. Crow-eating time: I scoffed in an earlier post at managing a billion assets, but have recently thought more about how a site like Amazon could approach this number of images when you look at variations in color and size n their inventory. It also discusses some of the differences between a PIM and a DAM, and why it is probably best to let each do its role.

On CMSWire, there’s an related, uncredited missive, Understanding the Value of a Connected Intelligent DAM, talking about how Marks & Spencer and the Smithsonian are using OpenText DAMs and AI to master their assets, and use them to “has fully automated processes to import and deliver thousands of assets daily to a variety of channels.”

Good food for thought when you consider what is next in your DAM journey.

A DAM system that manages pig’s faces and voices helps track swine flu in China

There’s a DAM that tracks Pig’s faces in China.

@suilee and @elsiechenyi write in the NY Times about China’s Tech Firms mapping pig faces (and using voice recognition, looking for coughs,)…

“…as In this Year of the Pig, many Chinese hogs are dying from a deadly swine disease, threatening the country’s supply of pork, a staple of Chinese dinner tables.”

““You can’t take a single picture of a pig,” said Mr. He, who is trying to add to his database of more than 200,000 pig images. He said his technology, which is being used in a pig farm in the southern region of Guangxi, won’t eliminate swine fever but could help farmers detect it sooner.”